News Service

Monday, January 30

  • Relying on customer surveys alone may mask poor service

    New research demonstrates perceptions of customer service do not always align with the actual service provided. Results from three studies found consumers belonging to underrepresented racial and ethnic groups rated poorer quality service less negatively compared to white consumers.  

  • Autism and animal behavior expert to deliver lecture at Iowa State

    Dr. Temple Grandin will deliver a lecture titled “Let’s Talk About Pets” in the Memorial Union Great Hall on Thursday, Feb. 2. Grandin is a professor of animal science at Colorado State University who has consulted on both livestock handling equipment design and animal welfare. Grandin is also a leading author on the topic of autism.

  • George Washington Carver Day in Iowa celebrated at Iowa State University Feb. 1

    Iowa State University will celebrate the state of Iowa’s first George Washington Carver Day on Feb. 1 with a program featuring speakers from three states, student readings and Carver-inspired foods. The program, which is free and open to the public, will be held in the Great Hall of the Memorial Union, with a pre-program reception at 5 p.m. and program at 5:30 p.m.

  • Iowa State University researchers will harness machine learning to provide residents with personalized warnings of heat emergencies

    An automated heat alert system built using innovative machine learning technology could improve preparedness for extreme heat. A research team led by Iowa State University has received a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation to gather data and develop an automated heat warning system for susceptible Des Moines neighborhoods.

  • Discovery of metabolic switch could lead to targeted treatment of obesity, cancer

    Iowa State University researchers have discovered how to modify the function of an enzyme crucial to fat production in fruit flies, which could lead to more effective treatments of cancer and childhood obesity in humans. 

  • Cyclone researchers: Warming climate means more and stronger Atlantic tropical storms

    Christina Patricola is studying tropical cyclones here in Cyclone Country. In one new research paper, Patricola and her collaborators report a warming climate could increase the number of tropical cyclones and their intensity in the North Atlantic, potentially creating more and stronger hurricanes. A second paper with other collaborators examines a possible explanation for the relatively constant number of tropical cyclones around the globe every year.