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Friday, February 11 2011

News

 

Iowa population over 100 years: A first look at the 2010 Census

David Peters, assistant professor of sociology, has looked at population trends across Iowa counties between 1910 and 2010. His research brief describes major trends across metropolitan, micropolitan and rural areas, and presents historical county data for comparisons.

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences dean Whiteford announces his June 30 retirement

Liberal Arts and Sciences dean Michael Whiteford announced to members of his college community this week that he will retire on June 30 and move to Oregon to be closer to family members. Whiteford has been a faculty member in the anthropology department for 39 years and LAS dean since September 2003.

 

President Geoffroy to Legislature: Budget cuts jeopardize progress

In his testimony before the Iowa Legislature's education appropriations subcommittee Feb. 9, ISU President Gregory Geoffroy reaffirmed the university's commitment to its land-grant mission and the people of Iowa, but said continued budget cuts jeopardize progress.

Feb. 28 forum set for comments on athletics NCAA certification process

The public is invited to attend a Feb. 28 forum (5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Campanile Room, Memorial Union) on a self-study of Iowa State's athletics program. The six-month study, undertaken by several teams of ISU faculty, staff, students and community leaders, is part of the NCAA Division I certification process. Public forum participants will get an overview of the study results, and will have opportunities to ask questions and offer comments.

News release.

ISU student wins $10,000 for charity and trip to Spain in Ford Focus video competition

There's a good chance Tyler Stafford could sell anything to anyone. After all, the Iowa State senior convinced Ford Motor Co. and 2,862 of its closest Facebook friends that he should win $10,000 for his favorite charity, a trip for two to Spain and a three-month test drive of the 2012 Ford Focus. Stafford entered his two-minute video sales pitch to the Ford Focus Global Test Drive competition held on Facebook last fall.
News release.

One of the first lunch-counter civil rights demonstrators will speak at ISU Feb. 15

In 1960, four African-American college freshmen started a sit-in at a North Carolina dime store lunch counter. That simple act of civil disobedience evolved into a five-month protest by thousands that helped launch the civil rights movement in the South. Joseph McNeil, one of the four students, will speak about his experiences at Tuesday, Feb. 15, in the Memorial Union Great Hall. His talk, "Reflections of One of the Greensboro Four," is free and open to the public.

News release.

Global comprehensive health organization, One Health Commission, locates to ISU

The One Health Commission, a globally focused organization dedicated to promoting improved health of people, animals, plants and the environment is locating at the Iowa State University Research Park. The commission was formed in 2009 to establish "closer professional interactions, collaborations, and educational opportunities" for physicians, veterinarians, and other health science-related professionals.

News release.

Veishea 2011 concert lineup announced

Student organizers of this year's Veishea celebration, set for April 11-17, have announced the Live @ Veishea concert artists. Concerts will be held Friday, April 15, and Saturday, April 16, from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. in the Molecular Biology parking lot. New this year: Single night ticket sales for ISU students, faculty, staff and alumni.

More info.

New ISU study finds eyewitness memory susceptible to misinformation after testing

A new Iowa State study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology finds that there may be good reason to question the recall of some eyewitnesses. The study by Jason Chan (far right in photo), an ISU assistant professor of psychology; and Moses Langley, a former ISU graduate student, summarizes two experiments finding that subjects who witnessed a criminal event and were tested about it immediately afterward were more susceptible to having misinformation -- or false information -- instilled in their later recall.