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Wednesday, June 14 2017

Iowa State's Formula SAE team in racing action at Formula North

Iowa State formula racers think they have the testing, race experience for more success

Iowa State's formula racing team is preparing for the season-ending race in Nebraska. The team has already solved race-day problems, completed long test runs, built a lighter car, improved aerodynamic efficiency and made gear-shifting easier on the drivers. All that has team leaders expecting to bring some speed to the race track.

Emily Hayden in a classroom with stacks of books

Read outside the box to keep students learning during summer months, says ISU professor

There is some learning that's lost when children are out of school for the summer. While most children don't want to think about hitting the books during summer vacation, Iowa State's Emily Hayden has some creative suggestions for parents to encourage learning and prevent summer slide. 

A schematic showing how researchers launched and studied exciton-polaritons.

Researchers image quasiparticles that could lead to faster circuits, higher bandwidths

A research team led by Iowa State University's Zhe Fei has made the first images of half-light, half-matter quasiparticles called exciton-polaritons. The discovery could be an early step to developing nanophotonic circuits that are up to 1 million times faster than current electrical circuits. The researchers report their finding in the scientific journal Nature Photonics.

Locke Karriker

Iowa State veterinarians work to strengthen food safety and drug efficacy in pork production

Iowa State University veterinarians are taking a closer look at how commonly prescribed antibiotics move through and exit pigs. The research has implications for pork production practices and for food safety.

This image shows how Hexcrete cells can be stacked on top of each other by a crane to build wind turbine towers up to 140 meteres high.

Concrete for taller wind turbine towers passes tests, could help expand wind energy nationwide

A research team led by Iowa State's Sri Sritharan has just finished an 18-month, $1 million study of concrete technology for taller wind turbine towers. Sritharan said lab tests demonstrate the technology will work. Economic studies also say the technology can be cost competitive. Sritharan said the taller towers could enable wind energy production in all 50 states.