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Monday, May 20 2019

  • These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership

    Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees. However, new research finds cultural values significantly limit its effectiveness.

  • Calling attention to gender bias dramatically changes course evaluations

    With growing evidence of gender bias on student course evaluations, a new intervention developed by Iowa State University researchers may help reduce bias against women instructors. They added language to the evaluation form aimed at making students aware of potential biases, which yielded significantly higher scores for women instructors.

  • Cardinal Space Mining builds hybrid trencher-bucket system to go for the gravel

    Cardinal Space Mining will test its latest mining machine during a competition at the University of Alabama this week. Team members think a new hybrid system for digging and loading buried gravel (representing subsurface Martian ice) could be the key to successful mining runs.

  • Precision radiation therapy is now a treatment option for pets at Iowa State University animal hospital

    The Hixson-Lied Small Animal Hospital at Iowa State University recently opened a new radiation treatment facility for pets with tumors. The facility delivers stereotactic radiation therapy, a high-dose and precise option that can reduce greatly the number of treatments necessary to get the desired results. The treatment also causes less disruption to a pet’s life and has fewer side effects.

  • Senegal native, new Iowa State graduate sets his sights set on sustainable energy

    Mouhamad Diallo moved to Iowa from Senegal in 2013. Six years later, he’s graduating from Iowa State University with a dual degree in mechanical engineering and materials science. After graduation, he’ll pursue a Ph.D. in materials science, studying sustainable energy to improve lives not only in Senegal, but around the world.

  • Student graduating from Iowa State — 20 years after starting college in Brazil

    This weekend, Patricia O’Connell will finally finish at Iowa State University what she started in Brazil 20 years ago: a bachelor’s degree in psychology. Her degree sets her on a path to pursue her passion combining psychology and fitness in a career as a health educator.

  • You’ll find her in the stacks: ISU graduating senior will be third-generation librarian

    Cassandra Anderson is following in her mother’s and grandmother’s footsteps, as she graduates from Iowa State University this weekend and begins her next adventure: becoming a third-generation librarian.

  • Four Iowa State students named Goldwater Scholars

    Four Iowa State University students have received Goldwater Scholarships, the third time in the last decade that all four ISU Goldwater candidates have been selected for the nation's premier undergraduate scholarship in mathematics, natural sciences and engineering.

  • Study shows value of sharing energy – including wind and solar – across America’s grids

    Iowa State engineers contributed to a study of the economic value of significantly expanding the connections between the country's eastern and western power grids. Expanding the connections could allow wind power from the Midwest and solar power from the Southwest to move back and forth across the country. The two-year, $1.5 million study was part of a $220 million Grid Modernization Initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  • ISU study: Fifteen years of mosquito data implicate species most likely to transmit West Nile virus in Iowa

    A study published this week that analyzed 15 years of mosquito surveillance data shows Iowa’s western counties experience a higher abundance of the species thought to most commonly carry West Nile virus. Culex tarsalis, the mosquito species most often implicated in West Nile transmission, usually becomes most active in early September. The data support similar findings in Nebraska and South Dakota.

  • Obstacles to overcome before operating fleets of drones becomes reality

    The technology exists to replace a single remote controlled drone with an automated fleet, but an Iowa State researcher says there are several obstacles to tackle first. He is part of a team developing models to efficiently operate a fleet, while maintaining security. 

  • As monarchs migrate northward, experts ask Iowans to keep habitat in mind

    A sizable population of monarch butterflies is fluttering toward Iowa this spring. What can Iowans do to put the species on a more sustainable footing after years of declines? An Iowa State University expert discusses best practices for monarch conservation.

  • Iowa State names alumnus as next dean of engineering

    W. Samuel Easterling from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University has been named the next James L. and Katherine S. Melsa Dean of Engineering at Iowa State University. He will begin his new role July 15.

  • Jack Trice statue to return to central campus

    The Jack Trice Statue, which has been located at Jack Trice Stadium since 1997, will be returned to Iowa State's central campus. The statue of Trice, Iowa State's first African-American student-athlete, needs to be relocated due to construction of the new Sports Performance Center. A committee will help identify how to further enhance Trice's legacy in and around athletics facilities.

  • ISU 4U Promise students busy wrapping up first year on campus

    It's been a year of adjustment and new opportunities for the first cohort of ISU 4U Promise students. Lorena San Elias and Darrick Burrage talk about their first year on campus and how the promise program helped make college a reality. 

  • Research sheds light on genomic features that make plants good candidates for domestication

    New research details how the process of domestication affected the genomes of corn and soybeans. The study looked at sections of crop genomes and compared them to the genomes of ancestor species. The results shed new light on what makes a species a good candidate for domestication.

  • Two Iowa State students named Udall Scholars

    Two Iowa State University students have been named Udall Scholars for 2019 — the first time since 2001 that more than one ISU student has been selected for the honor in the same academic year.

  • Iowa State geotechnical engineer studied failed levees, researches potential solutions

    Cassandra Rutherford, an Iowa State geotechnical engineer, has inspected failed levees along Midwestern rivers. And now she's working with other engineers to develop technologies that could improve levee performance. Those technologies include using electricity to inspect levees for internal defects and using "biocementation" to strengthen the soil surface of earthen levees.

  • Rurality, social identity is driving polarization in Iowa

    As the race for the 2020 presidential election ramps up, so too will questions about voter attitudes in states that switched from blue to red in 2016. Iowa had more counties flip from Democrat to Republican than any other state, and the reason why had little to do with economic anxiety, according to a new Iowa State University study. Instead, the research shows rurality, education and race significantly predicted the change from Democrat to Republican. 

  • Play your way through Reiman Gardens with larger-than-life toys and games

    Reiman Gardens teamed up with an Iowa State University architecture lecturer and design and engineering students to create eight larger-than-life toys and games — each with an ecological twist — for its exhibit this year. Starting April 27, visitors will find some of their favorite games throughout the gardens, inspired by KerPlunk, Connect Four, chess and more.