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Friday, January 12 2018

  • Millennials will soon dethrone boomers as largest voting bloc

    Dave Andersen sees a significant political shift on the horizon as millennials surpass baby boomers as the largest voting generation. Baby boomers have dominated political issues for the past 40 years and fundamentally are a different generation in many ways, said Andersen, an assistant professor of political science. 

  • The Iowa FIRST LEGO® League State Championships: crowds, bright minds and robots

    Students all over the state are preparing for the Iowa FIRST LEGO® League State Championships Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 13 and 14, at Iowa State University’s College of Engineering.

  • First ISU 4U cohort applying for fall 2018 admission

    Denisse San Elias was in the eighth grade when Iowa State University made a promise to her and every student at King and Moulton elementary schools in Des Moines. Five years later and now a senior at East High, San Elias is realizing the significance of that promise. San Elias is part of the first cohort of ISU 4U Promise students who will attend Iowa State in the fall.

  • Jan. 18 lecture will tackle freedom of expression on college campuses

    The first lecture of the Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Series is set for Thursday, Jan. 18, at 6 p.m. “Balancing Freedom of Expression and Diversity: Campus Conversation” will be held in the Memorial Union Sun Room. Mariah Watson, former student government president at the University of California, Davis; and Howard Gillman, chancellor of the University of California, Irvine, will discuss First Amendment rights and the concerns of diverse populations on university campuses.

  • Iowa State University researchers receive EPA grant to study harmful algal blooms in Iowa lakes

    A new grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will allow ISU scientists to develop new tools to predict and combat harmful algal blooms, a growing threat to human and animal health in Iowa’s lakes. Cyanobacteria, which have the ability to produce toxic byproducts, can grow quickly and form blooms that discolor lake water, typically in warm, shallow surface water during the summer months.

  • Celebrate the life, service of Martin Luther King Jr. in January

    Civil rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Martin Luther King Jr. will be honored at Iowa State University and in the Ames community throughout the month of January. Martin Luther King Jr. Day is Monday, Jan. 15, a university holiday.

  • Engineers make wearable sensors for plants, enabling measurements of water use in crops

    Iowa State's Liang Dong is leading development of graphene-based, sensors-on-tape that can be attached to plants and can provide data to researchers and farmers about water use in crops. The technology could have many other applications, including sensors for biomedical diagnostics, for checking the structural integrity of buildings, for monitoring the environment and, with modifications, for testing crops for diseases or pesticides.

  • WHO gaming addiction classification an important step for treatment, says ISU prof

    The World Health Organization has classified video game addiction as a mental health disorder. Iowa State professor Douglas Gentile says the WHO's decision is an important step in getting people the help they need. 

  • Media Advisory: Iowa State developing plans to advance Iowa's bioscience economy

    A consultant's report released Dec. 19 recommends ways lawmakers can invest in the biosciences to help grow the state's economy. Iowa State University leaders are preparing to advance the effort by promoting research in biobased chemicals; precision and digital agriculture; and vaccines and immunotherapeutics.

  • 2017 Year in Review

    As 2017 comes to an end, the Iowa State University News Service staff is looking back and sharing some of its favorite and more popular stories of the year.

  • Corn genetics provides insight into the crop’s historical spread across the Americas

    Evolutionary bottlenecks brought on by domestication have caused the genome of corn to retain harmful mutations over the course of millennia, according to a new study from an Iowa State University scientist. The study takes a journey through the past by studying genetic changes in corn.

  • Researchers developing, testing nanovaccine to protect against the flu virus

    A team of researchers working across disciplines and universities is developing a flu nanovaccine that preliminary studies suggest could be more effective than today's seasonal shots. The National Institutes of Health is supporting the research with a five-year, $2.8 million grant. The project is a good example of how the Nanovaccine Institute based at Iowa State University is designed to work.

  • Adversity pushes Iowa State senior to find new direction in pursuit of degree

    A conversation in a bowling alley helped Nik Heftman land a job with CBS News in New York. For a guy who faced his share of obstacles to earn a degree, he felt his hard work had finally paid off. 

  • Iowa State senior sees health setback as ‘a blessing in disguise’

    Kevin Burgoni was on track to graduate from Iowa State University in four years, until a sudden and scary health situation changed his timeline. 

  • Science Bound served as the springboard for biology grad's adventure

    First-generation Iowa State graduate Grace Ansah fell in love with biology, and plans to go to medical school -- with a side trip to her family's homeland in Ghana first.

  • Software engineer's route to success: Passion

    Software engineer Anne Tesar is driven for adventure. After a whirlwind undergraduate experience inside and outside the classroom, she's headed to a job on Microsoft's graphics team following graduation.