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Saturday, September 30 2017

  • Bovine embryo transfer helps ISU veterinarians improve herd genetics

    Iowa State’s College of Veterinary Medicine offers students and current veterinarians opportunities to get hands-on experience with bovine embryo transfer, a growing practice that helps cattle producers pass on desirable genetics to more calves. But it requires a trained eye.

  • Photojournalist Lynsey Addario — witness to the human cost of war — will speak at ISU

    A Pulitzer-Prize winning photojournalist who has covered every major conflict and humanitarian crisis of the past 15 years will speak at Iowa State University. Lynsey Addario will present "It's What I Do" at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12, in the Memorial Union Great Hall. Addario works regularly for The New York Times, National Geographic and Time Magazine. Her public talk is free and part of the university's World Affairs series.

  • U.S. Air Force general and Iowa State alumnus will speak on defense and security Oct. 9

    An Iowa State alum and U.S. Air Force general who develops and evaluates requirements for Air Force-wide modernization programs at the Pentagon will speak at Iowa State University. Maj. Gen. Clinton Crosier will present "National Defense and International Security" at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 9, in the Memorial Union Great Hall. His public talk is free and part of the university's World Affairs series.

  • School, health and behavior suffer when children have TV, video games in bedroom

    A new Iowa State University study is one of the first to demonstrate the consequences of allowing children to have a TV or video game system in their bedroom. Researchers found children spent less time reading, sleeping or participating in other activities when they could go in their room and watch TV or play video games. As a result, they did not do as well in school and were at greater risk for obesity and video game addiction.

  • 80th anniversary of massacre time for remembrance and recognition of solidarity

    October marks the 80th anniversary of the 1937 Haitian massacre, which killed an estimated 20,000 Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent. Megan Jeanette Myers says the anniversary is a time for reflection and recognition. The ISU assistant professor is a co-founder of Border of Lights, an organization that provides support to border communities and commemorates the lives lost in the massacre.

  • Three Iowa State College of Design programs rank in top 25 nationally

    The latest survey of practitioners by DesignIntelligence placed Iowa State’s graduate interior design program ninth in the nation for 2017-18. ISU’s undergraduate landscape architecture program ranked 11th and the undergraduate architecture program 22nd. DesignIntelligence is a quarterly publication for leaders in design professions. Its annual report, “America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools,” is the only national college ranking survey that focuses exclusively on design. It ranks programs from the perspective of leading practitioners who hire and supervise recent graduates.

  • MEDIA ADVISORY: Iowa State University ag experts available for comment on 2017 harvest

    ISU agricultural experts explain the grain markets, agronomic conditions and weather trends that will shape this year’s harvest. All four experts are available to news media for interviews.

  • Midlife depression may stem from tension with mothers and siblings, Iowa State study finds

    Relationships with our mothers and siblings continue to have an effect on our well-being, particularly at midlife. A new study led by Iowa State University researcher Megan Gilligan found that tension with our mothers and siblings, similar to our spouses, is associated with symptoms of depression.

  • Team PrISUm steps up to world stage, prepares to race across Australian Outback

    Team PrISUm is preparing to take its new "Solar Utility Vehicle" on a 1,900-mile race across the Outback of Australia. The Bridgestone World Solar Challenge is Oct. 8-15. Iowa State's student-engineers think they've designed and built a car that can comfortably make that journey.

  • Iowa State announces $145 million endowment to support College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    A gift initially reported in January will result in a new endowment of approximately $145 million to support the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The endowment is made possible through a gift from an anonymous donor couple of an equity stake in Curriculum Associates, LLC, which recently entered into a capital partnership.

  • High-skilled workers leaving Iowa because of lack of jobs

    A shortage of high-skilled jobs is a primary factor driving Iowa’s brain drain, according to a new analysis by Iowa State University researchers. The report measured Iowa’s competitiveness in attracting and retaining highly skilled, educated workers as compared to the rest of the country.

  • U.S. News rankings: Iowa State 53rd among national publics; first in ag/bio engineering

    The latest undergraduate rankings from U.S. News and World Report magazine have Iowa State tied for 53rd among public national universities. Iowa State's program in agricultural and biosystems engineering is tied for No. 1. And Iowa State's learning communities program is recognized by the magazine.

  • Iowa State receives $50 million commitment to name College of Business

    Debbie and Jerry Ivy's $50 million gift is the largest-ever commitment to the college. In recognition of the couple’s generosity, the college will be renamed the Debbie and Jerry Ivy College of Business, pending approval by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa. Once approved, the Ivy College of Business will be the first donor-named college at Iowa State.

  • $14 million committed by Kent Corporation, Iowa Corn Promotion Board and Sukup Manufacturing Co. for Iowa State feed mill, grain science project

    Kent Corporation is committing $8 million, the Iowa Corn Promotion Board $4 million and Sukup Manufacturing Co. $2 million in support of a new Iowa State educational and research facility for feed milling and grain science. The $14 million in gifts are the first to be announced for the $21.2 million feed mill and grain science complex, which will be funded entirely through private giving.

  • Fall enrollment is second highest on record

    Iowa State's fall 2017 enrollment is 36,321, the second-largest in school history. Overall enrollment is down about one percent from last year's record 36,660 students. The new student body number reflects a "leveling off" university leaders have predicted over the past year, following a decade of growth and eight consecutive years of record enrollment. Iowa State's student body is the most diverse ever, and ISU continues to enroll more Iowans than any other university in the world.

  • Iowa State physicists contribute to Higgs boson analysis, understanding

    Iowa State University physicists have been part of an international search for evidence that the Higgs boson, as predicted, most often decays into two bottom quarks. That search has been a challenge -- billions of bottom quarks are produced inside the Large Hadron Collider and most have nothing to do with the Higgs boson. But physicists believe they finally have evidence of the hard-to-find decay.

  • Network to prepare students of color for math degrees receives NSF grant

    The National Science Foundation has announced a grant for an Iowa State University-led initiative designed to provide a network of support for students of color interested in mathematics. The network will include mathematicians of color from U.S. colleges, universities and industry who want to invest time in, share their expertise with, and learn from students of color and their teachers.

  • ISU professor helping lead effort to expand digital literacy in Iowa

    Access to digital technology has far outpaced the availability of educational resources to promote responsible use. Douglas Gentile, a professor of psychology at Iowa State University, fears what the consequences might be if that trend is not reversed. That is why Gentile is working to expand digital literacy programming in schools.