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Thursday, August 23 2012

  • Special commission on media violence confirms aggression link, includes ISU professor

    As president of the International Society for Research on Aggression, ISU Distinguished Professor of Psychology Craig Anderson appointed an international Media Violence Commission last December to prepare a public statement on the known effects of media violence exposure, based on the current state of scientific knowledge. The commission, which included Iowa State psychology professor Douglas Gentile, published its report in the latest issue of Aggressive Behavior. It concludes that the research clearly shows that media violence consumption increases the relative risk of aggression.

  • Memorial services set for Barbara Mack

    Observances are planned to remember longtime journalism faculty member Barbara Mack, who passed away Aug. 23. No funeral services will be held.

    Iowa State students, colleagues and friends will hold a campus memorial observance on Friday, Sept. 7, at 2:30 p.m. near the Campanile. And Mack’s family and friends in Des Moines will gather to celebrate her life and mourn her passing at Hoyt Sherman Place on Sunday, Sept. 9, at 2 p.m.

    Gifts or memorial donations should be directed to the Animal Rescue League of Iowa, Friends of Iowa Public Television, or ISU’s Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication.

  • Erskine Bowles will speak about the national debt Sept. 13

    Erskine Bowles, president emeritus of the 17-campus University of North Carolina (UNC) system, a former White House chief of staff and co-chair of a bipartisan national commission on debt reduction, will speak at Iowa State University about the country's fiscal health. Bowles' talk, "A Conversation on the National Debt," will be at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, in the Memorial Union Great Hall. On Friday, Sept. 14, Bowles will introduce Steven Leath during Leath's celebratory installation as Iowa State's 15th president. Leath served as a vice president for the UNC system during Bowles' tenure as president (2006-10).
  • Iowa State, Ames Lab researchers study the structure of drug resistance in tuberculosis

    A research group led by Edward Yu of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory is beginning to study disease resistance in tuberculosis. The researchers started their TB studies by describing the structure of a regulator that controls the expression of a pump that removes toxins from the bacteria. The finding was recently published online by the journal Nucleic Acids Research.

  • This season’s influenza strain among pigs and humans appears mild

    Increasing reports this month of humans infected by influenza after close contact with pigs at county and state fairs shouldn’t send pork producers – or anyone else, for that matter – scrambling for the panic button, veterinary and animal science experts at Iowa State University said this week.

  • Leath named to IFDC board of directors

    Iowa State University President Steven Leath has been elected to a three-year term on the board of directors of the Muscle Shoals, Ala.-based International Fertilizer Development Center. IFDC focuses on increasing and sustaining food security and agricultural productivity in developing countries through the development and transfer of effective and environmentally sound crop nutrient technology and agribusiness expertise.

  • Iowa State's School of Education director addresses emphasis on literacy education

    National and state education reform efforts are emphasizing scientifically based early reading instruction, and research points to the need for those foundational skills. Ralph E. Reynolds, director of Iowa State's School of Education, applauds the greater commitment to literacy/reading education, including here in Iowa. The past president of the International Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, Reynolds says there are some general guidelines educators can follow to strengthen literacy in most students.

  • Iowa State researchers feed pigs, chickens high-protein fungus grown on ethanol leftovers

    An Iowa State University research team led by Hans van Leeuwen is feeding high-protein fungi grown on the leftovers of ethanol production to pigs and chickens. The feed-production process also cleans some of the water used in ethanol production, allowing more water to be recycled back into biofuel production. The process was recently named a global grand winner of the International Water Association's Project Innovation Awards in Applied Research.

  • Drought creating waves of uncertainty for livestock producers

    Some of the key safety nets that benefit crop farmers dealing with this year’s scorching drought won’t help livestock producers who have been saddled with high feed costs and growing uncertainty, according to two agricultural experts at Iowa State University. Crop insurance doesn’t help cattle or swine producers while high corn prices make it more expensive for farmers to feed their herds. The resulting higher feed prices have pushed producers to cull more dairy cows than in previous years.  

  • Iowa State, Ames Lab researchers invent new tool to study single biological molecules

    Sanjeevi Sivasankar of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory is leading a research team that has developed new microscope technology to study biological molecules. The technology allows researchers to make 3-D measurements of single molecules with unprecedented accuracy and precision. The technology could be useful for medical researchers who need high-resolution data from microscopes.

  • Drought management plan under way in Ames; ISU is doing its part

    Iowa State faculty, staff and students continue to save water and are looking at new ways to conserve in the midst of this summer's drought.

  • Iowa State, Argonne physicist wins presidential award for neutrino research

    Mayly Sanchez of Iowa State University and the Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago has won a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. It is the highest honor awarded by the U.S. government for early career researchers. Sanchez studies neutrinos and is working with several major physics experiments.