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Thursday, October 12 2017

  • Iowa State astronomer says star dust helps explain mysterious dimming star

    Iowa State's Massimo Marengo is part of a team of astronomers working to understand the mysterious dimming of Tabby's Star. The star was found by citizen scientists who noticed unprecedented dips in the star's brightness. The unusual dimming led to a lot of potential explanations, including speculation that alien megastructures built to harvest the star’s energy were passing in front of the star. The astronomers report that space dust orbiting the star is the likely cause of the star's long-term dimming.

  • Fertilizers adjust nitrogen cycle of prairie plants, according to Iowa State University study

    Excess nitrogen can change the composition of tallgrass prairies, granting an advantage to plants that flower earlier in the growing season over plants that flower later, according to new research from an Iowa State University scientist. The findings have implications for wildlife and pollinating insects that use prairie plants for habitat.

  • MSNBC’s Ali Velshi to present Manatt-Phelps lecture on Oct. 18

    MSNBC anchor and business correspondent Ali Velshi will discuss the impact of the Trump administration’s domestic and international policy shifts when he presents the fall 2017 Manatt-Phelps Lecture in Political Science.

  • Iowa State University researcher finds further evidence that fats and oils help to unlock full nutritional benefits of veggies

    Some dressing with your greens may help you absorb more nutrients, according to a study from an Iowa State University scientist. The research found enhanced absorption of multiple fat-soluble vitamins in addition to beta-carotene and three other carotenoids. The study appeared recently in the peer-reviewed American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and the results may ease the guilt of countless dieters who fret about adding dressing to their salads.

  • Chief of Staff, CFO Lackey to Auburn

    Chief of Staff and Chief Financial Officer Miles Lackey will leave Iowa State at the end of the calendar year. He has accepted the chief of staff position at Auburn University, Auburn President Steven Leath announced Oct. 6. Lackey will begin his new role Jan. 2, 2018. He has served Iowa State since April 2012.

    "Miles has been instrumental over the past five years in advancing Iowa State's strategic priorities to provide a high-quality, affordable, accessible education for our students; expand the university's research and economic development enterprises; and secure federal, state and private support while operating as efficiently as possible," said Iowa State University Interim President Benjamin Allen. "We thank him for his tireless efforts and expertise to enhance Iowa State's role as one of the top land-grant institutions in the country."

    The search for a new CFO and chief of staff will commence after the new Iowa State University president is in place.

  • Iowa State architecture professor on international team of scholars working to conserve Rome's Flaminio Stadium

    Thomas Leslie, Iowa State Morrill Professor and Pickard Chilton Professor in Architecture, is on an international team of scholars awarded a Getty Foundation grant to pave the way for conserving a threatened, mid-century architectural masterpiece. The Flaminio Stadium was designed and constructed by Pier Luigi Nervi and his son Antonio for the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome. 

  • Change Agent: Tomas Gonzalez-Torres, aerospace engineering lecturer, NASA veteran

    Tomas Gonzalez-Torres, a 1998 Iowa State graduate, is back on campus after working as a NASA flight director. He's passing on some of the lessons he learned at NASA while helping students with senior design projects related to space and courses in lab techniques and computer applications.

  • Researchers demonstrate engineering approach to combine drugs, control parasitic worms

    Iowa State University's Santosh Pandey helped lead a project that demonstrates an engineering technology used in cell studies can also be used for drug testing on parasitic roundworms used as a model whole organism. In this case, the technology quickly developed a cocktail of four drugs that was effective in paralyzing the roundworms. The discovery is reported in the journal Science Advances.

  • Iowa State University project: Prairie strips yield big environmental benefits

    The ISU Prairie STRIPS project has found the strategic use of native prairie plants among agricultural fields yields a wide range of environmental benefits, including erosion and runoff reduction and increased wildlife habitat. The findings, published this week, draw on 10 years of data and cover dozens of environmental metrics.

  • High-intensity workouts send the wrong message, says Iowa State professor

    As high-intensity interval training, or HIIT, has grown in popularity, so has the debate over whether it is an effective public health solution. An Iowa State University professor of kinesiology says the workouts are not sustainable for the majority of people who are trying to lose weight and move more.

  • 2017 World Food Prize Laureate will present Iowa State's Borlaug Lecture Oct. 16

    Akiniwumi Adesina, the 2017 World Food Prize Laureate, will present Iowa State's Norman Borlaug Lecture. “Betting on Africa to Feed the World” will be at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 16, in the Memorial Union Great Hall. A reception and student research poster display will precede the lecture at 7 p.m. in the South Ballroom. The free, public lecture is held in conjunction with the annual World Prize celebration. 

  • Bovine embryo transfer helps ISU veterinarians improve herd genetics

    Iowa State’s College of Veterinary Medicine offers students and current veterinarians opportunities to get hands-on experience with bovine embryo transfer, a growing practice that helps cattle producers pass on desirable genetics to more calves. But it requires a trained eye.

  • Photojournalist Lynsey Addario — witness to the human cost of war — will speak at ISU

    A Pulitzer-Prize winning photojournalist who has covered every major conflict and humanitarian crisis of the past 15 years will speak at Iowa State University. Lynsey Addario will present "It's What I Do" at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12, in the Memorial Union Great Hall. Addario works regularly for The New York Times, National Geographic and Time Magazine. Her public talk is free and part of the university's World Affairs series.

  • School, health and behavior suffer when children have TV, video games in bedroom

    A new Iowa State University study is one of the first to demonstrate the consequences of allowing children to have a TV or video game system in their bedroom. Researchers found children spent less time reading, sleeping or participating in other activities when they could go in their room and watch TV or play video games. As a result, they did not do as well in school and were at greater risk for obesity and video game addiction.

  • 80th anniversary of massacre time for remembrance and recognition of solidarity

    October marks the 80th anniversary of the 1937 Haitian massacre, which killed an estimated 20,000 Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent. Megan Jeanette Myers says the anniversary is a time for reflection and recognition. The ISU assistant professor is a co-founder of Border of Lights, an organization that provides support to border communities and commemorates the lives lost in the massacre.

  • Three Iowa State College of Design programs rank in top 25 nationally

    The latest survey of practitioners by DesignIntelligence placed Iowa State’s graduate interior design program ninth in the nation for 2017-18. ISU’s undergraduate landscape architecture program ranked 11th and the undergraduate architecture program 22nd. DesignIntelligence is a quarterly publication for leaders in design professions. Its annual report, “America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools,” is the only national college ranking survey that focuses exclusively on design. It ranks programs from the perspective of leading practitioners who hire and supervise recent graduates.

  • MEDIA ADVISORY: Iowa State University ag experts available for comment on 2017 harvest

    ISU agricultural experts explain the grain markets, agronomic conditions and weather trends that will shape this year’s harvest. All four experts are available to news media for interviews.

  • Midlife depression may stem from tension with mothers and siblings, Iowa State study finds

    Relationships with our mothers and siblings continue to have an effect on our well-being, particularly at midlife. A new study led by Iowa State University researcher Megan Gilligan found that tension with our mothers and siblings, similar to our spouses, is associated with symptoms of depression.

  • Team PrISUm steps up to world stage, prepares to race across Australian Outback

    Team PrISUm is preparing to take its new "Solar Utility Vehicle" on a 1,900-mile race across the Outback of Australia. The Bridgestone World Solar Challenge is Oct. 8-15. Iowa State's student-engineers think they've designed and built a car that can comfortably make that journey.

  • Iowa State announces $145 million endowment to support College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    A gift initially reported in January will result in a new endowment of approximately $145 million to support the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The endowment is made possible through a gift from an anonymous donor couple of an equity stake in Curriculum Associates, LLC, which recently entered into a capital partnership.

  • High-skilled workers leaving Iowa because of lack of jobs

    A shortage of high-skilled jobs is a primary factor driving Iowa’s brain drain, according to a new analysis by Iowa State University researchers. The report measured Iowa’s competitiveness in attracting and retaining highly skilled, educated workers as compared to the rest of the country.

  • U.S. News rankings: Iowa State 53rd among national publics; first in ag/bio engineering

    The latest undergraduate rankings from U.S. News and World Report magazine have Iowa State tied for 53rd among public national universities. Iowa State's program in agricultural and biosystems engineering is tied for No. 1. And Iowa State's learning communities program is recognized by the magazine.